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There are a few match types that involves several (as in, more than two) sides.

Basic non-elimination matchesEdit

The most common example of a non-elimination match is the Three Way match (Also known as a Triple Threat match; was known by the now-defunct WCW as a "Triangle" match), where three wrestlers battle it out under standard rules. However, one distinction from a singles match is that these matches usually omit disqualifications. In many promotions, however, there are typically no distinctions between the two terms. The Four-Way match is similar, but involves four wrestlers. American independent promotion, USA Xtreme Wrestling (USA Pro Wrestling) hosted a match involving 8–12 competitors known as the 8 Ball Challenge. These types of matches can be used in certain situations to take a title off a wrestler, without "weakening" him in the process.

The Triangle match combines elements of tag team wrestling with multi-competitor wrestling. In this match contested by three competitors, one of the competitors must remain outside the ring, to await a tag from either of the other two combatants. Thus, while being tagged out may afford time to recuperate, one cannot win unless they are tagged back in. The Six-Pack Challenge is similar, but involves 6 wrestlers, with 4 men outside the ring at a given time. The Triangle match can be expanded to accompany more wrestlers (i.e. the Four Corners match is a match where four wrestlers are involved).

Six-Man Mayhem is a unique multi-competitor match used mainly in Ring of Honor. It involves six wrestlers, with two actively in the ring, and four others outside standing at the turnbuckles. Instead of tagging in and out to become legal, the outside wrestlers enter the ring using "Mexican" rules—entering the ring as soon as another leaves. International Wrestling Entertainment (IWE) has used this match, calling it a Six-Pack Challenge.

Championship ScrambleEdit

IWE features a match called the Championship Scramble in which none of the wrestlers are eliminated. Two wrestlers start the match and every five minutes another wrestler enters until all five participants are present. After the last wrestler enters, there is a five minute time limit. Each time a wrestler scores a pinfall or submission, he becomes the interim or unofficial champion, and such reigns aren't recorded as official reigns. Five minutes after the final wrestler enters, the wrestler that scores the last pinfall or submission is declared the winner and the official champion.

Basic elimination matchesEdit

Most matches involving a larger number of competitors are typically elimination matches. These matches may begin with a normal start, where all of the competitors are in the ring at the same time when the match begins, or may have a staggered start, in which wrestlers enter at timed intervals.

The most common example of an elimination match is the Three-Way Dance, where the first fall eliminates one wrestler, reducing the match to a standard one-fall match. The Three-Way Dance was popularized in Extreme Championship Wrestling, where it became a regular specialty of the promotion. A Four Corners match is similar, except it involves four wrestlers. Some promotions use a tag format for the match instead of having all of the wrestlers in the ring at the same time. The Fatal Four-Way Elimination match is often used in place of the Four-Way Dance.

Another variation of elimination matches is the Survivor Series match, most commonly held at the IWE pay-per-view event of the same name. A Survivor Series match is similar to a tag-team match, except that whenever a wrestler is pinned, taps out or disqualified, he is eliminated from the match. In a Survivor Series match, the wrestlers are divided into two teams, typically with four or five members on each team, and the winners ("survivors") of the match are the wrestlers still remaining when all members of the other team have been eliminated.

Battle royalEdit

A multi-competitor match type in which wrestlers are eliminated until one is left and declared winner. Typical battle royals begin with 20 participants in the ring, who are then eliminated by being thrown over the top rope and having both feet touch the venue floor.

Gauntlet matchEdit

A Gauntlet match is, in a sense, a quick series of one-fall one-on-one matches. Here, two wrestlers begin the match, and are replaced whenever one is eliminated (by normal means), with the last person standing being named the winner. A Gauntlet match may also be played out in multiple "parts" as part of a storyline (where a face wrestler must face a series of a heel wrestler's underlings before facing the heel himself, for instance) – this was common in World Championship Wrestling in the early 1990s, where it was referred to as a Slobber Knocker. A participant involved in a Gauntlet match may be said to be "running the gauntlet", although in most cases this designation is reserved for those who are involved for most of the match.

The Gauntlet may also be referred to as a Turmoil match, a likely backformation from Tag Team Turmoil, which is used to denote a Gauntlet involving tag teams. In singles gauntlet matches in World Championship Wrestling, pins were counted without the need of the single man being on top of the gauntlet member.

Relay matchEdit

The match has two (or more) teams of between 3 or 12 members to a team and before the match there will be a coin toss to see which team switches out first. Every 3 or 5 minutes the teams will switch. The first team to get a pinfall wins. It is sometimes contested under hardcore rules.

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